Implantable Collamer LensesAn alternative to contact lenses that
works with the eye to correct vision.

What are ICLs?

An Implantable Collamer Lens (ICL) works with the eye to correct vision. Unlike traditional contact lenses that go on the surface of the eye, the ICL is positioned inside the eye between the iris and the natural lens where it stays indefinitely. If your vision changes dramatically, however, it can be removed from the eye.

Are ICLs right for me?

If you answer “Yes” to any of these questions, you may be a good candidate for ICLs. Schedule a consultation
  • Are you nearsighted?
  • Are you between the ages of 21 and 45?
  • Are you seeking permanent vision correction but desire an alternative to contact lenses?

Frequently Asked Questions

What is an Implantable Collamer Lens (ICL)?
An Implantable Collamer Lens (ICL) works with the eye to correct vision. Unlike traditional contact lenses that go on the surface of the eye, an ICL is positioned inside the eye between the iris and the natural lens where it stays indefinitely. If your vision changes dramatically, however, it can be removed from the eye.
Am I a candidate?
If you are between 21 and 45 and nearsighted, you are an excellent candidate for an ICL. It is preferable that you have no previous ophthalmic surgery or history of ophthalmic diseases such as glaucoma, iritis, or diabetic retinopathy.
What if I have thin corneas or dry eye?
The cornea is the curved portion on the front surface of the eye. An ICL does not have any effect on the cornea and may be appropriate if you have thin corneas. ICLs do not cause or contribute to dry eyes. If you have dry eyes, ask your doctor if an ICL may be the best vision correction option for you.
What are the potential risks?
As with any surgical procedure, there are potential complications associated with the surgery itself; these include: irritation of the conjunctiva, corneal swelling, eye infection, non-reactive pupil and irritation of the iris. In the vast majority of cases, these complications are short-term, transient in nature, and will be treated by the doctor performing the surgery.

Other complications that can occur are associated with the correction of your vision; these include: halo and/or glare around lights, under or over correction of your vision (which may require retreatment), induced dry eye, and induction of higher order aberrations that can impact the quality of vision. ICL procedures do not cause or worsen dry eye and the lens can be removed if needed. Early complications reported at the time of surgery or within the first week after an ICL surgery include: removal and reinsertion of the lens at the time of initial surgery; removal or replacement of the ICL after surgery; pupillary block resulting in raised eye pressure, which may necessitate the creation of an additional peripheral iridology to improve fluid flow, or by clearing the iridotomy made prior to implantation of the lens.

Potential Complications that can occur after the first-week post-surgery include: the development of small cloudy areas or opacities on your natural crystalline lens, which may or may not cause visual symptoms – in a very limited number of cases these opacities can become more widespread and develop into a cataract. Other complications include an increase in the rate of endothelial cell loss (a loss that occurs naturally with age) from the back surface of the cornea (which may require lens explanation and could result in a corneal transplant) and an increase in the pressure inside of the eye (post-op drops are used to minimize pressure increase).

You should carefully review all of the benefits and risks of an ICL eye surgery with your eye care professional before making the decision to proceed with the procedure.